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  • Inspecting & Cleaning Potable Water Storage

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    Call us today for a proposal to inspect or clean your potable water storage tank or tower. or send us your contact information along with tanks sizes and types to tankinspections@aol.com or Call us toll free at 888-481-1768 or if you need an inspection quote simply fill out the form below:

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  • Clean Water Tank Project

    Sediment being removed from the floor of a potable water storage tank

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News Crew Coverage of Water Tower Cleaning

November 7th, 2014, Ginger Allen and the CBS 11 i-Team watches as my company inspects and cleans a north Texas water tower. The tower was cleaned as a normal maintenance procedure. A light- brown dusting of sediment was removed from the interior floor before it could get deep enough to support bacteria and become a problem.  

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The tower was cleaned by a Commercial Diver who was trained at OCEAN CORP, Houston, Texas. The Diver is sealed in his own environment, then washed down with a chlorine solution. Because we specialize in the inspection and cleaning of Potable Water Storage Facilities, all of our equipment is purchased for, and only used in, potable water.

This utility is doing a great job of maintaining their system. However, utility managers across the country struggle to get the funds to properly maintain their systems. The EPA is currently considering a regulation that would require all water storage facilities to be inspected and cleaned at regular intervals. This new requirement could improve the water quality for millions of Americans.

Ron Perrin Speaks to I-Team Reporter Ginger Allen

 

The EPA is taking comments on this proposed regulation until the end of the year. We have the contact information posted on our blog, or you can just take our poll at: www.cleanwatertankproject.com. The poll results will be turned in to the EPA at the end of the year.

 

Sediment being removed

 
See the full Story HERE:

http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2014/11/19/water-towers/http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2014/11/19/water-towers/

Robert Perrin Gets DIVE LAB CERTIFICATION

After a hard week of training in PANAMA CITY, Florida, Robert Receives his certification to work on and maintain our Kirby Morgan Mask and Helmets.  Robert is also authorized to Teach the kirby Morgan Operator /User Course for KMDSI Equipment.  This is a great fit for Robert in his role as Safety Manager for Ron Perrin Water Technologies.

Robert Perrin at dive lab

Robert Perrin with Training Director Rodney (Rocky) Heikkinen at Dive Lab Inc.

Dive Lab’s primary purpose is to maintain and operate a state of the art test facility for testing surface supplied diving helmets, full face masks, and associated life support equipment for Kirby Morgan Diving Systems International (KMDSI) of Santa Maria California. In addition to testing, Dive Lab is (KMDSI’S) official training center for all KMDSI dealer repair and maintenance technician training. Dive Lab also provides repair/maintenance and configuration training courses for the commercial, military and scientific diving communities worldwide and provides the commercial diving community with answers to all types of diving related questions. Dive Lab’s goal is the steady improvement of diving equipment and safety for all facets of diving.  Dive Lab is in beautiful Panama City Florida.

 

For a free quote for water tank inspection or cleaning call 817-377-4899

Ron Perrin earns CSHO through the OSHA Regional Training Center at UTA

RON gets CSHO

Ricardo, Mike, and Ron Perrin UTA OSHA Regional Training Center, Arlington, Texas.

On Friday August 22nd, 2014, Ron Perrin along with several others were awarded the Certified Health and Safety Official (CSHO) certificate after meeting all requirements for the certification.

CSHO LOGO                                                                                                UTA TIEC

If you want to learn about safety in the workplace,

this is the place to do it.  OSHA EDUCATION CENTER

“This is some of the best training I have ever had, I am always surprised at what I did not know after attending the classes.  The instructors have real world experience and put worker safety above compliance but teach you the real value of both and how it is possible to be safe, in compliance and may a profit.”   –  Ron Perrin

New rule requires assessment and corrective action

NEW FOR 2014-  The Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) that will be in full effect by 2016 requires assessment and corrective action when there are indications of coliform contamination.  Lets talk about Assessment and Corrective action.

Under the RTCR, there is no longer a monthly maximum contaminant level (MCL) violation for multiple total coliform detections.  New revisions require systems that have indicators of coliform contamination in the distribution system to assess the problem and take corrective action that may reduce cases of illnesses and deaths due to potential fecal contamination and waterborne pathogen exposure.   The rule says “The Distribution System”  of course, what that means is,  ”The Water Utility Manager or Operator” is now required to assess the problem and take corrective action when there are indications of coliform contamination.

Getting started assessing the problem:

A tank inspection may be the best place to start with the assessment.

We have the most choices to inspect your water storage tanks & towers.  Our custom made cameras are the low cost favorite, next is our Remotely operated vehicle (ROV), after that we have a dive team available for the best inspection possible.  We also offer the best method for cleaning your tank.

ROV UNDERWATER
  ROV UNDERWATER

Our qualified and experienced dive team will do the Job right.  If accumulated sediment is found in the tank our dive team can take the corrective action needed to keep your tank in compliance.  Removing accumulated sediment levels removes the habitat that bacteria and other contaminants can use to get a foothold in the water system, with the protection of the sediment the intruder is then able to grow and become a larger problem.  Unlike a traditional “Washout” that may not be able to remove 100% of the sediment due to the tight corners of the tank design, our potable water dive crew can remove all loose sediment quickly returning your storage tank or tower to sanitary condition.  While our inspection methods require no disruption in service and no water loss at all, our cleaning methods require lockout tag-out procedures while working near pumps and minimal water loss to be able to move the sediment from the floor of the tank out to the utility yard.

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Sediment being removed from a storage tank

For a free quote for inspecting or cleaning your water storage tank or tower please call 1-888-481-1768

Note:  Click here to download the entire Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) in PDF format.

In Texas Call 817-377-4899

Robert Perrin Earns SSH through the OSHA Regional Training Center at UTA

Instructor Ed Williams and Robert Perrin

Instructor Ed Williams and Robert Perrin

February 2014.  Robert Perrin Earns Specialist in Safety and Health through the OSHA Regional Training Center at UTA and was promoted to Safety Manager at Ron Perrin Water Technologies.

Professional Certification Programs

SSH shieldSpecialist in Safety and Health (SSH)
Robert’s focus was on Construction, Permit Required Confined Space and Fall protection.To complete this certification he also became a First Aid and CPR Instructor.

Check out his profile and connect to Robert on  Linked In.

Naegleria fowleri amoeba found in drinking water.

August 2013, the death of a 4-year-old boy staying near Violet, Louisiana, was linked to the Naegleria fowleri amoeba. The child had been playing on a slip and slide connected to the St. Bernard Parish’s water system that was later found to be contaminated with the amoeba.

More common in Australia NBC news reported that this was the first case in the U.S.

For more see: “Four year old’s Death linked to Rare Amoeba in Water System”

Over time almost all tanks accumulate sediment on the floor. Any amount of sediment can become a habitat for bacteria, protozoa (like Cryptosporidium) and viruses. However, when tests show chlorine depletion, the idea of removing the sediment is usually not thought of. Additional treatment chemicals are usually the first line of defense, quickly becoming chemical warfare and potentially leaving the tank with low, or no, chlorine protection for long periods. American Water Works Association (AWWA) recommends that potable water storage tanks be cleaned every 3 to five years. Few states actually require tanks to be cleaned on a regular basis, and some don’t require it at all.

When a contaminant (bacteria, protozoa or viruses) enters a water storage tank and finds sediment to get a foothold in, chlorine can be quickly depleted while the contaminants grow under the protection of the sediment. Even otherwise harmless bacteria can help to deplete chlorine reserves leaving the tank vulnerable to more dangerous contaminants.

Removing sediment from the floor of potable water storage tanks greatly reduces the chance that any contaminant can get a foothold in the distribution system and grow to become a larger problem.

So why isn’t cleaning potable water storage tanks a common practice? Removing tanks from service to perform cleaning is time consuming and expensive. The smaller the water utility, the more difficult it is to find the budget for preventive maintenance.  There are many contractors that offer Potable Water Dive crews that can remove floor sediment with little or no down time and minimal water loss. Using a qualified potable water dive crew to clean water storage tanks can save the water utility time and water.

Keeping potable water storage tanks free of accumulated sediment is essential for the health of the system and the health of your customers. If you administer a drinking water system, make a plan to schedule cleanings and stick to it.

References:

For more information on Potable Water Divers see:  www.ronperrin.com

For more information on Naegleria fowleri amoeba in drinking water see:

http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/naegleria/public-water-systems.html

NOTE: You cannot be infected with Naegleria fowleri by drinking contaminated water. In very rare instances, Naegleria infections may also occur when contaminated water from other sources (such as inadequately chlorinated swimming pool water or contaminated tap water) enters the nose. (For example: when people submerge their heads or cleanse their noses during religious practices, and when people irrigate their sinuses (nose) using contaminated tap water.)

– Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 

Cryptosporidium Drinking Water Health Advisory  EPA  March 2001

Information about the New Health Care Law

LOVE it or Hate it things are changing.  What do you think?